IRS Tip : This Simple Trick Will Boost The Size Of Your 2013 Mortgage Interest Tax Deduction

Looking for a way to reduce your federal tax liability? Consider making your January 2014 mortgage payment a few days early.

Homeowners who send their January 2014 mortgage payment before New Year’s Day may benefit from a bigger mortgage interest tax deduction on their 2013 federal tax returns.

Claim Your Mortgage Interest Tax Deduction

It’s November and, within a few weeks, you’ll receive your mortgage statement for January 2014. Study it, and you’ll notice that the payment is split into as many as 4 separate parts :

  1. Principal : A partial repayment on the original monies borrowed
  2. Interest : Based on your mortgage rate, a payment for the right to borrow said monies
  3. Tax : Partial payments of your annual tax
  4. Insurance : Partial payment of your annual homeowners insurance bill

Together, these four parts are called “PITI” but it’s the “interest” piece that’s of most interest to homeowners. This is because U.S. federal tax code allows homeowners to claim mortgage interest as a tax-deduction in the year in which it was paid.

Today’s homeowners can boost their 2013 mortgage interest tax deduction, therefore, by making their upcoming January 2014 mortgage payment before the calendar flips to January.

By making your payment in 2013, your lender will book interest paid to the tax year of 2013, and the extra interest paid will be added to your IRS Form 1098.

For homeowners paying mortgage insurance, the benefits are even bigger.

Mortgage insurance is a required part of all FHA and USDA mortgages; and is required for some conventional loans via Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Mortgage insurance insures the loan against default, and helps to keep low-downpayment loans available to U.S. homebuyers.

As part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, mortgage insurance payments are tax-deductible for 2012 and 2013. Mortgage insurance is not tax-deductible in 2014, however.

If your current mortgage requires mortgage insurance, then, you can maximize your tax savings by paying the January 2014 mortgage early.

Before You Pay Your Mortgage Early, Know The Pitfalls

Making your January mortgage payment a few days early does not come without caveats.

First, not every mortgage is eligible for mortgage interest tax deductions. The IRS outlines mortgage interest tax deduction eligibility on its website. You’ll want to make sure your loan qualifies for mortgage interest tax deduction.

Second, because of the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), some tax filers find their normal, allowable tax deductions pared by the IRS — including those deductions related to mortgage interest paid. The AMT may reduce the benefits of making January’s mortgage payment in December.

Furthermore, remember that the bonus deduction applies to January’s payment only.

The IRS allows you to make (and claim) January’s mortgage payment in December because the payment is imminently due. Attempts to make your February payment will be in vain. Your lender will not accept your payment, and the IRS will not apply your deduction.

Lastly, remember to consult a tax professional before making a personal tax decision. Everyone’s tax situation is unique and the advice offered may not apply to all taxpayers equally.

Deadline Dates For 2013 Mortgage Interest Tax Deduction

If you plan to pay your January 2014 mortgage statement in 2013 in order to increase your 2013 tax deductions, it’s wise to “do it early”.

As the end of the year approaches, mortgage lenders are notoriously short-staffed as operations teams use vacation days and otherwise take days off of work.

Lenders typically require extra time to receive and process payments during the holidays.

If you pay your mortgage electronically, or via auto-pay, have your check clear no later than Monday, December 23, 2013.

If you send your checks via mail, have your payment stamped and sent no later than Wednesday, December 18, 2013.

http://themortgagereports.com/13966/mortgage-rates-preview-rates-rise-lock-asap

About

Realtor with Greg Garrett Realty, actively licensed in the state of Virginia

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: